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Have you ever heard of the STOP Ransomware? Probably not, as few write about it, most researchers don't cover it, and for the most part, it targets consumers through cracked software, adware bundles, and shady sites. Ryuk, GandCrab, and Sodinkibi get huge and deserved media attention because they generate giant ransom payments, can halt business and local governments, and affect enterprise customers, which are the bread and butter for AV companies. Yet, based on Michael Gillespie's ID Ransomware submissions and support requests at BleepingComputer, for the past year, it has been the most actively distributed ransomware in the wild. To give you some perspective, the ransomware identification service ID Ransomware gets approximately 2,500 ransomware submissions a day. Of those, between 60-70 % are STOP ransomware submissions. This amount of submissions beats out any other ransomware that users are submitting to the service when trying to get help. STOP is getting so big that the image above looks like Pacman eating all of the other ransomware! In order to distribute STOP, the ransomware developers have teamed up with shady sites and adware bundles. These sites promote fake software cracks or free programs, which are really adware bundles that install a variety of unwanted software and malware onto a user's computer. One of the programs installed via these bundles is the STOP Ransomware. Some of the reported cracks that are have been seen installing STOP include KMSPico, Cubase, Photoshop, and antivirus software. It is not only cracked, though, as many of these shady sites offer downloads of free software, but are simply just adware bundles that install the ransomware. Even worse, some of these variants also bundle the Azorult password-stealing Trojan with the ransomware for a double-attack on the victim. Otherwise, there is nothing particularly special about the STOP Ransomware.  It encrypts just like any other ransomware, appends an extension, and drops a ransom note. What makes it so much of a pain is the sheer amount of variants that keep being released. In fact, right now, there are more than 159 variants that we know about. Visit OUR FORUM to learn more most active and destructive ransomware.

Password manager LastPass has released an update last week to fix a security bug that exposes credentials entered on a previously visited site. The bug was discovered last month by Tavis Ormandy, a security researcher with Project Zero, Google's elite security and bug-hunting team. LastPass believed to be the most popular password manager app today, fixed the reported issue in version 4.33.0, released last week, on September 12. In a blog post, the company said the bug only impacts its Chrome and Opera browser extensions. If users have not enabled an auto-update mechanism for their LastPass browser extensions, they're advised to perform a manual update as soon as possible. This is because yesterday, Ormandy published details about the security flaw he found. The security researcher's bug report walks an attacker through the steps necessary to reproduce the bug. Since the bug relies on executing malicious JavaScript code alone, with no other user interaction, the bug is considered dangerous and potentially exploitable. Attackers could lure users on malicious pages and exploit the vulnerability to extract the credentials users had entered on previously-visited sites. According to Ormandy, this isn't as hard as it sounds, as an attacker could easily disguise a malicious link behind a Google Translate URL, trick users into visiting the link, and then extract credentials from a previously visited site. Like any other applications, password managers are sometimes vulnerable to bugs, which are in all cases eventually fixed. Despite this vulnerability, users are still advised to rely on a password manager whenever they can. Using a password manager is many times better than leaving passwords stored inside a browser, from where they can be easily extracted by forensic tools and malware. For more visit OUR FORUM.

 

China's internet could continue to operate as a national intranet in the case of a cyber-attack or foreign intervention. The structure of the Chinese internet is unlike any other country, being similar to a gigantic intranet, according to research published by Oracle last week. The country has very few connection points to the global internet, has zero foreign telcos operating within its borders, and Chinese-to-Chinese internet traffic never leaves the country. All of these allow China to disconnect itself at will from the global internet and continue to operate, albeit with no connectivity to western services. "Put plainly, in terms of resilience, China could effectively withdraw from the global public internet and maintain domestic connectivity (essentially having an intranet)," Oracle's Dave Allen said. "This means the rest of the world could be restricted from connecting into China, and vice versa for external connections for Chinese businesses/users."

Windows 10 KB4515384 is the latest cumulative update that Microsoft released on September 10 with a fix for high CPU usage bug and multiple vulnerabilities. Microsoft initially stated that the cumulative update comes without any known issues, but the company has now updated the changelog to confirm a bug affecting both Start menu and Windows Search. Microsoft has also confirmed audio issues in this cumulative update. It looks like Windows 10 KB4515384 is plagued by several other issues as well, including a bug that disables Ethernet or WiFi connectivity. A number of users are reporting on Microsoft community forum, Reddit and Windows 10’s Feedback Hub that network adapters have stopped working after applying this update. “Cumulative update (kb4515384) causes the NIC to fail to enable with a code 10 error. Reinstalling network drivers from Intel or Windows Update sources does not resolve the issue. However removing the update through the ‘Programs & Software’ panel or using a recovery point set *before* the update fully resolves the issue,” a user documented the bug on Feedback Hub. “KB4515384 breaks ethernet and wifi adapters on my PC. Appears to create new devices as they’re labeled ‘#2’ and when exposing hidden devices in Device Manager the previously named devices appear. Uninstalling these / new or old drivers do not fix the issues (i.e. “ethernet unplugged” which it is clearly not). The only option was to uninstall this update,” another user confirmed the annoying bug on Feedback Hub. If you are affected by broken network adapters bug, you can disable and re-enable the adapter in Device Manager, and you might be able to use the adapters again after a system reboot. Follow this on OUR FORUM.

In late August, we learned Microsoft was planning its next Surface event for October 2nd – although the fact that it was announcing hardware was more of an assumption than an official confirmation. But today Microsoft sent out a second, formal invite to journalists, and it’s now clear the company is planning big things for its next event.
There are two main details alluding to a major announcement: For one, TNW has learned both Surface head honcho Panos Panay and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella will be in attendance. For another, Microsoft will be livestreaming the event this time around.
Those two details may not sound like much, but they’re worth noting. While Panay is always at Surface events, Nadella is only there on occasion. Likewise, several Surface events have been low-key, press-only events with no livestream. The company didn’t have a livestream for the Surface Book 2 or Pro 6, for example. But it did have a livestream when it introduced the Surface Studio and Surface Book 2 – major new hardware categories for the company.
We understand that Microsoft will have both hardware and software to show off. We’ll likely see a new the Surface Book, which is nearly 2 years old now, and perhaps a spec bump for the more recent Surface Go, Pro, and Laptop. But we also think it’s likely the company will finally reveal its long-rumored dual-screen, extra-portable Surface, codenamed Centaurus. We’ve also heard rumblings of a Surface speaker.
Centaurus is expected to run Microsoft’s sprightly Windows Lite, which is rumored to be the company’s mobile-first alternative to Windows 10. This will run universal Windows apps and come with an all-new interface (as opposed to the less remarkable and unpopular Windows 10 S).
We’ll be there October 2, so stay tuned for more. The livesteam begins at 10AM that day.
Source - Pic: thenextweb, imgbb

Twitter suspended accounts of multiple Cuban politicians, including the account of the country’s leader, Raul Castro, and his daughter, as well as the account of a Cuban TV talkshow Mesa Redonda. Some of the journalists who collaborated with the programme in the past, including journalists who work for RT en Español, have also had their accounts suspended on Twitter. The mass ban/censorship followed the televised announcement about the upcoming fuel shortages due to US policies.
Twitter commented by saying that the ban was implemented according to the social media giant’s policy that prohibits using multiple accounts to amplify political messages and propaganda…
But Twitter (as well as FB, Google, etc) shouldn’t do anything about the US, UK, and Israel’s psychological operations and mass propaganda on social media because those three are the good guys, right? Even though it is openly and officially stated that they create fake “sock puppet” accounts to brainwash people on the Internet, and that they’ve been doing so for years…
Oh, well, I’m pretty sure Twitter just follows the rules of the Free Market™ while making such decisions.
Source and Links to be found at fort-russ.com - Pic: Stream.org

 

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